Quick Answer: Can V May?

How may or How can?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice.

Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense.

You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better..

What is the meaning of May I help you?

An offer for assistance, often from a salesperson or employee. A: “May I help you?” B: “Yes, I can’t seem to find this dress in my size.” See also: help, may.

Can could may exercise?

Exercise: modal auxiliaries can, could and may 4. You want to borrow my bicycle. ( … You want to look at my photos. ( … You offer to get me something to eat. ( … You want to play with my Nintendo. ( … You want to drive my new car. ( … You offer to get me some more wine. (More items…

What mean May?

1a —used to indicate possibility or probabilityyou may be rightthings you may need —sometimes used interchangeably with canone of those slipups that may happen from time to time— Jessica Mitford —sometimes used where might would be expectedyou may think from a little distance that the country was solid woods— Robert …

Is there anything I can help you?

Is there anything I can do to help? This shows your support for this person. Another way to phrase this which is more formal but more distant is: … This phrase is good to use when a friend or acquaintance has bad news about an illness, a death in the family, money problems, etc.

Why is it May I instead of can I?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

Is May you correct grammar?

The start of a sentence with “May you” is a phrase which can be applied as such to begin in a sentence. It’s correct and not wrong. The use of “may” talks about possible actions or happenings in future.

Can I speak to or may I speak to?

“May I speak to …” asks for permission. “Can I speak to …” says you’re not asking for permission, you want so speak to … if it’s at all possible. You have a better chance of getting through to … if you use “can.” No, actually there’s no difference, except that “may” marks you as a stickler for formal grammar.

Can I vs May I vs Could I?

Whether these terms are interchangeable depends on how you use them: Discussing a Possibility: “Can” suggests a strong possibility or a general truth. “May” and “could” suggest we are less certain about something. Asking for Permission: You can use all three words to ask for permission.

How do you use may and can in a sentence?

Although, traditionally, can has meant “to be able” and may has meant “to be permitted” or to express possibility, both can and may are commonly used interchangeably in respect to permission. Example: He can hold his breath for 30 seconds. Meaning: He is able to hold his breath for 30 seconds.

How can or how may I help you?

The most polite expression is “How may I help you?” (“may,” not “many”). You will also hear people say “How can I help you?” To the punctilious, “may” is preferable to “can,” but both expressions are gracious and acceptable, much better than “Whassup?” (If I say, “How may I help?” I’m asking permission to help.

Can I request or request may?

‘May’ is more correct, as it is asking for permission. ‘Can’ literally means ‘is it (physically) possible?’ but is often used in this way by native speakers and would not be misunderstood or sound at all strange. ‘Could I use your bathroom?’

Is it I may or I might?

Past Tense. The grammatical distinction between the two words is tense-based—may is the present tense and might the past tense. Incorrect usage in this context is fairly rare because a native speaker would catch the error almost immediately: Incorrect usage: I thought I may go to the game.

Is May a question word?

While it is possible to use may to ask for permission or to grant permission, we use will or can when we want to ask someone to do something for us: May I use your telephone?

Where do we use may?

We use may in formal writing, especially academic English, to describe things which the speaker thinks are generally true or possible. In this case, it is a more formal equivalent of can.

Can could may might use?

Can Could May Might MustCan. Can – for ability. I can dance Tango. … Could. Could – past ability. I could run ten kilometres when I was younger. … May. May – for formal permission. May I come in? … Might. Might – for possibility. The electrician might be finished by tomorrow. … Must. Must – to express a formal request or necessity.

Can you please vs May you please?

may and can are used interchangeably when asking or giving permission. would (or will) and can (or could) are used interchangeably when making a request.

How do you use may might?

In popular usage and speech, may and might are used interchangeably when referring to possibility and probability, but there is a slight difference between the two.May is used to express what is possible, factual, or could be factual. … Might is used to express what is hypothetical, counterfactual, or remotely possible.More items…